Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching The Romance of the Rose

Approaches to Teaching The Romance of the Rose, edited by Daisy Delogu and Anne-Hélène Miller, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught this work are encouraged to contribute to this volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 28 October 2016.

Call for Essay Proposals for a Volume on Teaching French Neoclassical Tragedy

We invite proposals for a volume in the MLA Options for Teaching series entitled Teaching French Neoclassical Tragedy. A guiding question for the volume will be, Why teach French neoclassical tragedy, and why now?

Teaching French Neoclassical Tragedy aims to help faculty members in a variety of disciplines introduce French neoclassical tragedies to students in a manner that emphasizes both the corpus’s irreducible strangeness and its piercing relevance to our own troubled and transitional times. We are keen to showcase essays that seek to move past, or at least rethink, categories that in large part were imposed on this corpus during the past three hundred years. Essays that place the theatrical texts in productive dialogue with salon culture, the rise of the novel, or developments in philosophy and science are of particular interest, as are contributions that restore women to their status as full participants—as spectators, critics, and playwrights—in the theatrical conversation. In addition, we welcome submissions by scholars attentive to the newly emergent global history who draw attention to French neoclassical theater’s engagement with ideas and works from other national traditions, including European colonial expansion and francophone spaces beyond metropolitan France. In short, we hope to establish a conversation between specialists and nonspecialists that will open this compellingly complex corpus to new perspectives and audiences.

All the essays will have primarily pedagogical aims, and the volume will also dedicate a section to nuts-and-bolts issues in the classroom, with essays that outline successful assignments and practices. We will be careful to address a range of challenges and concerns pertinent to diverse institutional settings and various pedagogical formats: early modern courses, survey courses, first-year writing courses, comparative approaches to tragedy, seminars on politics and literature, and courses in translation. Finally, we hope to present innovative work on neoclassical tragedy in a variety of digital humanities approaches.

If you are interested in contributing an essay of 3,000–5,000 words, please send a two-page CV and 500-word proposal by 1 August 2016 to hbilis@wellesley.edu and ellenmc@uic.edu. Proposals should include the name(s) of the writer(s) you intend to discuss and the argumentative thrust of the proposed essay as well as clear pedagogic implications.

Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from the students.

CALL FOR ESSAY PROPOSALS FOR A VOLUME ON Teaching Beat Generation Literature

Proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA’s Options for Teaching series entitled Teaching Beat Generation Literature, to be edited by Nancy M. Grace. The purpose of the volume is to highlight key issues and pedagogical strategies for teaching Beat literature. The volume will include information for specialists and nonspecialists alike who are teaching at the secondary as well as undergraduate and graduate levels. A section or sections devoted to teaching resources will include teaching with images and film; teaching with anthologies; using electronic resources; and using editions, reference guides, collections of correspondence, biographies, and single-author studies.

Possible topics include teaching the national and global contexts of Beat literature, major Beat writers, censorship and Beat literature, aesthetic lineages of Beat literature, Beats and the popular media, Beat fiction, Beat poetry, Beat drama, Beat film, Beat memoirs, gender and sex in Beat literature, race and ethnicity in Beat literature, Beat literature and the contemporary environmental movement, Beat writing and technology, the Beat road tale, the influence of music (jazz, in particular) on Beat writing, Beat composition philosophies and histories, drug use and Beat writing, spirituality and religious traditions in Beat writing, transhumanism and posthumanism in Beat writing, and the aesthetic and cultural legacies of Beat writing.

If you are interested in contributing an essay of 3,000 to 3,500 words, please send an abstract of 500 words in which you outline your approach or topic and how it might enhance the teaching of Beat literature to Nancy M. Grace (ngrace@wooster.edu) by 1 July 2016.

Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from the students.

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching the Works of Karen Tei Yamashita

Approaches to Teaching the Works of Karen Tei Yamashita, edited by Ruth Y. Hsu and Pamela Thoma, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught the works of Karen Tei Yamashita are encouraged to contribute to this volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 June 2016.

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Approaches to Teaching Sand’s Indiana

This volume on Sand’s Indiana is greatly needed not only because the novel is widely taught but also because it could be taught better—and this volume provides exciting new insight for teaching it.

— Annabelle Rea, Occidental College

Indiana, George Sand’s first solo novel, opens with the eponymous heroine brooding and bored in her husband’s French countryside estate, far from her native Île Bourbon (now Réunion). Written in 1832, the novel appeared during a period of French history marked by revolution and regime change, civil unrest and labor concerns, and slave revolts and the abolitionist movement, when women faced rigid social constraints and had limited rights within the institution of marriage. With this politically charged history serving as a backdrop for the novel, Sand brings together Romanticism, realism, and the idealism that would characterize her work, presenting what was deemed by her contemporaries a faithful and candid representation of nineteenth-century France.

This volume gathers pedagogical essays that will enhance the teaching of Indiana and contribute to students’ understanding and appreciation of the novel. The first part gives an overview of editions and translations of the novel and recommends useful background readings. Contributors to the second part present various approaches to the novel, focusing on four themes: modes of literary narration, gender and feminism, slavery and colonialism, and historical and political upheaval. Each essay offers a fresh perspective on Indiana, suited not only to courses on French Romanticism and realism but also to interdisciplinary discussions of French colonial history or law.

Volume editors

David A. Powell
Pratima Prasad

Contributors

James Smith Allen, Christopher Bains, Carolyn Vellenga Berman, Kathrine Bonin, John T. Booker, Aimée Boutin, Patrick M. Bray, Peter Dayan, Molly Krueger Enz, Nigel Harkness, Doris Kadish, Véronique Machelidon, Shira Malkin, Françoise Massardier-Kenney, Margaret E. McColley, Isabelle Hoog Naginski, Allan H. Pasco, Lynn Penrod, Lauren Pinzka, Charles J. Stivale, Margaret Waller

viii & 219 pp.
Published: 2016
ISBN: 9781603292108 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781603292092 (cloth)

This volume is available in paperback, hardcover, and e-book formats. Visit the MLA bookstore for more information.

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Approaches to Teaching the Novels of Henry Fielding

The works of Henry Fielding, though written nearly three hundred years ago, retain their sense of comedy and innovation in the face of tradition, and they easily engage the twenty-first-century student with many aspects of eighteenth-century life: travel, inns, masquerades, political and religious factions, the ’45, prisons and the legal system, gender ideals and realities, social class.

Part 1 of this volume, “Materials,” discusses the available editions of Joseph Andrews, Tom Jones, ShamelaJonathan Wild, and Amelia; suggests useful critical and contextual works for teaching them; and recommends helpful audiovisual and electronic resources. The essays of part 2, “Approaches,” demonstrate that many of the methods and models used for one novel—the romance tradition, Fielding’s legal and journalistic writing, his techniques as a playwright, the ideas of Machiavelli—can be adapted to others.

Volume editors

Jennifer Preston Wilson
Elizabeth Kraft

Contributors

Stephen C. Behrendt, Scott Black, Pamela S. Bromberg, Jill Campbell, Leigh G. Dillard, J. A. Downie, James Evans, Carl Fisher, Joshua Grasso, George E. Haggerty, Anthony J. Hassall, Nicholas Hudson, Regina Janes, Christopher D. Johnson, Eric Leuschner, Nancy A. Mace, Brian McCrea, Lisa Maruca, Adam Potkay, Manushag N. Powell, Chloe Wigston Smith, Rivka Swenson, Earla Wilputte

ix & 236 pp.
Published: 2016
ISBN: 9781603292245 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781603292238 (cloth)

This volume is available in paperback, hardcover, and e-book formats. Visit the MLA bookstore for more information.

Call for Essay Proposals for a Volume on Teaching Mexicana and Chicana Writers of the Twentieth Century

Proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA’s Options for Teaching series entitled Teaching Mexicana and Chicana Writers of the Twentieth Century, to be edited by Elizabeth C. Martínez. The goal for this project is to consider the publishing boom of women writers both in Mexico and the United States (of Mexican descent), whose narratives burst on the scene in the late twentieth century. Contributions will address connections and disconnections between women’s writing in each nation, and compare-contrast or study major authors. The volume will highlight key issues and pedagogical strategies for teaching contemporary literary narratives. It will include information on the diverse topics and artistic strategies of, and influences on, Mexicana and Chicana writers, as well as focus on teaching techniques and concepts.

Possible topics may include but are not limited to the influence of and markers made by early publications of the Mexican writer Elena Poniatowska and the Chicana writer Sandra Cisneros; the Jewish and Arabic Mexicana experience; intersectionalities and agency in Chicana writing; the impact of the best-selling novelists Laura Esquivel and Angeles Mastretta; the influence of feminist theory by Gloria Anzaldúa; teaching texts in translation; sex as literary tool in Mexicana novels; queering in Chicana novels; gender and critical race studies through Chicana texts; late-twentieth-century discourses of women’s writing; disability studies in Chicana and Mexicana novels; testimonial narratives; the strange and the normal in writings by Carmen Boullosa, Brianda Domecq, and Silvia Molina; precursors and early (invisible) works by Chicanas; female authors and the modern literary canon; early Chicana criticism in literary journals; Third World consciousness in Chicana fiction; patriarchal systems in Mexicana texts; symbols and codes in Mexicana and Chicana narratives; film adaptations and digital presentation of Chicana and Mexicana writing and other interdisciplinary approaches.

Proposals should mention and define, as appropriate, specific terms, concepts, techniques, and classroom contexts. They should indicate the value of the intended topic to a broad range of instructors and maintain a clear focus on teaching. Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from the students.

For those interested in contributing an essay of 3,000 to 3,500 words for this innovative volume, please send an abstract of 500 words in which the approach and topic are outlined, including how it might enhance the teaching of Chicana and Mexicana literature of the twentieth century, to Elizabeth C. Martínez (emarti71@depaul.edu) by 15 May 2016.

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching the Works of Cormac McCarthy

McCarthyThe volume Approaches to Teaching the Works of Cormac McCarthy, edited by Stacey Peebles and Benjamin West, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught the works of Cormac McCarthy are encouraged to contribute to this volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 May 2016.

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching Austen’s Persuasion

Jane Austen's silhouette on a teapot
Jane Austen Teapot Cookie by Mischief Mari used under CC BY-SA 2.0.

The volume Approaches to Teaching Austen’s Persuasion, edited by Marcia McClintock Folsom and John Wiltshire, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught Persuasion are encouraged to contribute to the series volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 May 2016.

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching Plum in the Golden Vase

The volume Approaches to Teaching Plum in the Golden Vase, edited by Andrew Schonebaum, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught this work are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 March 2016.

Review of Approaches to Teaching Austen’s Mansfield Park

The June 2015 issue of Sensibilities published a review of the MLA’s Approaches to Teaching Austen’s Mansfield Park, edited by Marcia McClintock Folsom and John Wiltshire.

Tony Voss writes:

These essays together call continually on our imagination. I am struck particularly how often they refer to the true responsibilities of teaching.

You can read the full review in Sensibilities ([June 2015]: 79–85).

Purchase this book at the MLA bookstore (members get 30% off all titles).

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Review of Teaching French Women Writers of the Renaissance and Reformation

The October 2015 issue of Modern Language Review published a review of the MLA’s Teaching French Women Writers of the Renaissance and Reformation, edited by Colette H. Winn.

Leanna Bridge Rezvani writes:

The variety of authors, genres, and perspectives included in the volume is remarkable. This work will facilitate course design, supplement existing units on sixteenth-century literature, and ultimately lead to new avenues of enquiry.

You can read the full review in Modern Language Review (110.4 [2015]: 1133–34).

Purchase this book at the MLA bookstore (members get 30% off all titles).

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching James Fenimore Cooper

The volume Approaches to Teaching Cooper’s Leather-Stocking Tales and Other Works, edited by Stephen Carl Arch and Keat Murray, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught these works are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 February 2016.

Call for Essay Proposals for Volume on Teaching Contemporary Latin American Poetries

Essay proposals are invited for a volume in the MLA series Options for Teaching entitled Teaching Contemporary Latin American Poetries, to be edited by Jill S. Kuhnheim and Melanie Nicholson. The volume will include information and ideas for specialists and nonspecialists alike who are teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

We seek abstracts for essays in three broad areas.

  1. “Poetic Literacy and the Latin American Canon” will include essays that address fundamental issues surrounding the historical development of Latin American poetry and address approaches to teaching strategies for reading poetry. We hope to attract essays that highlight the excitement that poetry can generate and that articulate formal characteristics such as metrics and figurative devices in a broader understanding of the power of poetic language.
  2. “Traditional and Innovative Methods for Reading Poetry, Poets, and Movements” will deal with such topics as experimenting with form; reading difficult poetry and teaching the neobaroque; poetry, orality, and performance; poetry and music; poetry and adaptation to theater and film; poetry and new technologies; hybrid poetic forms; visual poetries; teaching indigenous poetries; teaching recent Afro-Hispanic and Brazilian poetry.
  3. “Different Contexts for Teaching Poetry” will include essays that consider poetry in the foreign language classroom; poetry and environmental studies; teaching trans-American poetries; new and old gendered issues; teaching poetry and translation and poetry in translation; poetry and cultural studies; poetry and human rights.

The abstract should clarify your intended topic, its importance to the field of poetry pedagogy, and the types of evidence (e.g., sample assignments from a class you have taught) or theories you hope to explore. It should also mention and define specific terms, concepts, techniques, and classroom contexts. Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from students. Your abstract should address the value of your intended topic to a broad range of instructors in the field as well as to students.

If you are interested in contributing an essay of 3,500–4,500 words, please submit an abstract of 350–500 words to Jill S. Kuhnheim, University of Kansas (jskuhn@ku.edu), and Melanie Nicholson, Bard College (nicholso@bard.edu), by 15 November 2015.

Contribute to an MLA Volume on Teaching Eliza Haywood

The volume Approaches to Teaching the Works of Eliza Haywood, edited by Tiffany Potter, is now in development in the MLA Approaches to Teaching World Literature series. Instructors who have taught these works are encouraged to contribute to the volume by completing a survey about their experiences. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey. The deadline for completing the survey and submitting an essay proposal is 1 November 2015.

Call for Essay Proposals for Volume on Teaching Young Adult Literature

Proposals are invited for a volume entitled Teaching Young Adult Literature, to be edited by Karen Coats, Mike Cadden, and Roberta Seelinger Trites. This volume in the MLA series Options for Teaching aims to bring together a variety of articles describing innovative and successful approaches to designing and teaching stand-alone young adult (YA) literature courses at the postsecondary level, as well as incorporating young adult texts into other undergraduate and graduate courses relevant to MLA members and faculty members in education and library science.

This volume will be a resource for teachers, both new and experienced, of YA texts. It will provide suggestions for supplementary materials and pedagogical activities for a variety of student audiences in many college settings. Abstracts that use specific YA texts as examples to demonstrate how to teach genres in YA literature (e.g., graphic narrative, historical fiction, the verse novel) are welcome, as are abstracts that focus on themes, topics, methods, and problems in teaching YA literature.

Your abstract should clarify your intended topic; setting; its relevance to the subject of YA literature pedagogy; the texts, genres, or theories you expect to explore; and the value of your intended topic to a broad range of instructors and students. Please note that any quotations from student papers will require written permission from the students. Contributors to a volume must be members of the MLA from the time that their contribution is submitted in the final, approved manuscript to publication.

If you are interested in contributing an essay of 2,000–3,000 words, please submit an abstract of 350–500 words to Karen Coats (kscoat2@ilstu.edu) by 1 November 2015.